Andy's Eagle Eye Home Inspections LLC - Licensed/Serving, Polk County / Osceola County / Orange County
 
 
 





$10,000 Honor Guarantee, Backed by InterNACHI

Certified by the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors













About Us

Our company is based on the belief that our customers' needs are of the utmost importance. Our entire team is committed to meeting those needs. As a result, a high percentage of our business is from repeat customers and referrals.
 
We would welcome the opportunity to earn your trust and deliver you the best service in the industry


 Andy's Eagle Eye
CREED
A home inspector always remembers his public trust.
With him rests the security of property and fortune.
As a public service he shuns the dishonest, the wicked and the avaricious.
For hundreds of years, he and his predecessors have placed trust and honor above temptation.
His honesty is incorruptible.
His allies are the custodians of law and order.
He is an artist at his trade and the symbol of skill and integrity to the world.
He will work hard to earn the trust of the people he will serve.


Andy,s Eagle Eye
Promise,

Choosing the right home inspector can be difficult.  Unlike most professionals, you probably will not get to meet me until after you hire me. Furthermore, different inspectors have varying qualifications, equipment, experience, reporting methods, and, yes, different pricing. One thing for sure is that a home inspection requires work -- a lot of work.  Ultimately, a thorough inspection depends heavily on the individual inspector’s own effort.  If you honor me by permitting me to inspect your new home, I guarantee that I will give you my very best effort.  This I promise you.



Our Full Inspections include:

  • roof, vents, flashings, and trim;
  • gutters and downspouts;
  • skylight, chimney and other roof penetrations;
  • decks, stoops, porches, walkways, and railings;
  • eaves, soffit and fascia;
  • grading and drainage;
  • basement, foundation and crawlspace;
  • water penetration and foundation movement;
  • heating systems;
  • cooling systems;
  • main water shut-off valves;
  • water heating system;
  • interior plumbing fixtures and faucets;
  • drainage sump pumps with accessible floats;
  • electrical service line and meter box;
  • main disconnect and service amperage;
  • electrical panels, breakers and fuses;
  • grounding and bonding;
  • GFCIs and AFCIs;
  • fireplace damper door and hearth;
  • insulation and ventilation;
  • garage doors, safety sensors, and openers;
  • 4- Point Insurance Inspections;
  • and much more.

Review our Standards of Practice at www.nachi.org/sop.htm for complete details.




Glossary Of Inspection Related Terms.

View A Sample Report;




The Cost of A home Inspection,

This is often the first question prospective home buyers ask a home inspector. (Asking the inspector about their qualifications, experience and how they get most of their business, should be the first questions.) In home inspection, one size does not fit all. The level of experience and talent of home inspectors varies. The size and age of homes varies. Some homes / condos can be inspected in 2 to 3 hours. Older, larger homes can take 4 or more hours. Some inspection reports might take an hour or two to complete, while others might take 4 hours or more. Some so called "informational" web sites state that home inspection fees run from $175 to $300, however, these "low" fees are usually based on an inspector doing 2 or 3 inspections per day. If a thorough inspection and report takes around 5 to 6 hours, how "thorough" is the inspector who does 3 inspections & reports in one day?
Inspectors quote inspection fees using different criteria or methods. Some charge a flat rate, others charge by the square foot of living area. Some charge by square foot of area under the roof, some charge by the price of the house and others charge by the amount of time spent (which is reflective of not only size but condition.) Some consider detached garages as part of the main house and do not charge for them (but may include the square footage into the overall size calculation) while others consider detached garages as outbuildings and charge extra for them.
Some inspectors charge for all the optional items, others charge for some of them, others will not inspect for certain items such as swimming pools or septic systems. Most inspectors have a minimum charge for their services. In some parts of the country the "general rule" of $100.00 per hour applies. Some charge for mileage from their location to the inspection site. Some inspectors maintain web sites where a prospective client can submit information about the property and receive a quote by e-mail.

 Let's put home inspection fees in perspective: If you're buying a $400,000 house and the inspection fee is $700, that's less than .2% of the cost of the house! Most real estate agencies charge 3% to 6% to sell a home, that would be $12,000 to $24,000 for a $400,000 house! The cost of a home inspection is a bargain, even if you paid $1500 for the inspection, and most are less than half that!
Aside from the time invested, the value of the inspection and report can be measured by its usefulness. If the inspection turns up little wrong with the house, you've bought some relatively inexpensive peace of mind. If the inspection finds serious problems, your $600 could end up saving you many thousands of dollars.

3 Deadly Mistakes Every Home Buyer Should Avoid.
Click here to learn more,


Seven Ways to Use a Home Inspection Report

 
In random order, I present to you seven different ways in which a home inspection report can be used by parties to a real estate transaction for mutual advantage and benefit.

  1. Buyers can consider the reported conditions of the home's systems to determine their ability to afford and maintain the property.  A home with a 12-year-old water heater, an 18-year-old furnace, and a 25-year-old composite-shingle roof is going to need some costly investments in the near future.
  2. Buyers can sometimes use information regarding undisclosed defects to negotiate the seller's action to repair the defect(s) or adjust the asking price for the home.
  3. Sellers can obtain a home inspection and use the report to disclose known defects to potential buyers.
  4. Sellers can obtain a home inspection and use the report to identify and correct significant defects that could interfere with a buyer's desire to submit a contract to buy the property.
  5. Buyers can use the inspection report as a punch list (or to-do list) for maintaining the property after purchase.
  6. Buyers/Sellers can use the report to communicate to contractors the nature of the defect(s) to obtain estimates for repair or to arrange for repairs or replacements.
  7. Buyers can sometimes use the inspection report as a means to withdraw from the contracted agreement to purchase the home when certain types of undisclosed defects are reported.

Buyers and sellers should consider obtaining inspection reports only from professional, full-time home inspectors.  Builders and contractors who generate inspection reports often use them as marketing tools and as a means to generate business for maintenance and repairs.  Doing so is a conflict of interest, so their reports do not always represent the actual conditions of the property.  Always use home inspectors who abide by a Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, and who continually upgrade their knowledge and skills with regular Continuing Education courses.



 
 

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